New to Factoring?

For those who aren't familiar with factoring, it is basically a fast way to get cash to run your business.

Factoring is Not a Loan

When you send your customers an invoice, they usually have 30 days to pay you back. Factoring companies will give you the bulk of the cash up front, sometimes within 24 hours, and collect the payments from your customers themselves. Once the invoices are paid in full, you’ll get the balance left over, minus a small fee.


Factoring Doesn't Require Debt

Sounds simple enough – fast cash for your business – no loans, no debt.

So how do you go about choosing the best factoring company?

Not all of them are created equal. Not all of them will give you the same level of service you need to help grow your business.

Everyone claims they have the simplest rate structure in the industry, no long-term contracts, same day funding, no up-front fees, no monthly minimums or maximums, etc., etc., etc.

We also offer these same benefits, but we GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU that other factoring companies don’t.

Here’s Why We Are The Factoring Company You Need For Your Business

No other factoring company matches our level of superior service and offerings.


As you can see, we simply have more to offer you.

Other factoring companies don’t even compare.
Anchorage

And Not All Factoring Companies Can Say This:

More than half of our new business comes through client referrals.

So, Can Your Company Use Factoring?

Of Course! Companies of all sizes, from small privately-owned companies to large multi-national corporations, use factoring as a way to increase their cash flow. Factoring spans all industries, including trucking, transportation, manufacturing and distribution, textiles, oil and gas, staffing agencies and more.

Companies use the cash generated from factoring to pay for inventory, buy new equipment, add employees, expand operations—basically any expenses related to their business. Factoring allows a company to make quicker decisions and expand at a faster pace.

Unlike a bank loan, factoring has…

  • No principle or interest to pay over time
  • No debt to repay
  • Unlimited funding potential – no caps
  • Fast funding – no waiting months like at a bank
  • Approval is based on the strength of your clients, not your credit
  • Startups are welcome in using funding services

Some of the benefits you receive with factoring are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information for the city of Anchorage

"

Anchorage's largest economic sectors include transportation, military, municipal, state and federal government, tourism, corporate headquarters (including regional headquarters for multinational corporations) and resource extraction. Large portions of the local economy depend on Anchorage's geographical location and surrounding natural resources. Anchorage's economy traditionally has seen steady growth, though not quite as rapid as many places in the lower 48 states. With the notable exception of a real estate related crash in the mid to late 1980s, which saw the failure of numerous financial institutions, it does not experience as much pain during economic downturns.The Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (TSAIA) is the world's third busiest airport for cargo traffic, surpassed only by Memphis and Hong Kong.

 

This traffic is strongly linked to Anchorage's location along ""great circle"" routes between Asia and the lower 48. In addition, the airport has an abundant supply of jet fuel from in state refineries located in North Pole and Kenai. This jet fuel is transported to the Port of Anchorage, then by rail or pipeline to the airport. Aerial view of the Port of Anchorage on Cook Inlet in 1999.The Port of Anchorage receives 95 percent of all goods destined for Alaska. Ships from Totem Ocean Trailer Express and Horizon Lines arrive twice weekly from the Port of Tacoma in Washington. Along with handling these activities, the port is a storage facility for jet fuel from Alaskan refineries, which is used at both TSAIA and Joint Base Elmendorf Richardson (JBER).The United States military used to have two large installations, Elmendorf Air Force Base and Fort Richardson, which originally stemmed from the branching off of the U.S. Air Force from the U.S. Army following World War II. In a cost cutting effort initiated by the 2005 BRAC proceedings, the bases were combined. JBER was created, which also incorporated Kulis Air National Guard Base near TSAIA. The combination of these three bases employ approximately 8,500 civilian and military personnel. These individuals along with their families comprise approximately ten percent of the local population. During the Cold War, Elmendorf became an important base due to its proximity to the Soviet Union, particularly as a command center for numerous forward air stations established throughout the western reaches of Alaska (most of which have since closed).While Juneau is the official state capital of Alaska, there are actually more state employees who reside in the Anchorage area. Approximately 6,800 state employees work in Anchorage compared to about 3,800 in Juneau.

 

The State of Alaska purchased the Center (which it renamed the Robert B. Atwood Building) to house most of its offices, after several decades of leasing space in the McKay Building (currently the McKinley Tower) and later the Frontier Building.From Anchorage people can easily head south to popular fishing locations on the Kenai Peninsula or north to locations such as Denali National Park and Fairbanks. Anchorage (officially called the Municipality of Anchorage) is a unified home rule municipality in the southcentral part of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is the northernmost city in the United States with more than 100,000 residents and the largest community in North America north of the 60th parallel. With an estimated 298,610 residents in 2012, it is Alaska's most populous city and contains more than 40 percent of the state's total population; among the 50 states, only New York has a higher percentage of residents who live in its most populous city. Altogether, the Anchorage metropolitan area, which combines Anchorage with the neighboring Matanuska Susitna Borough, had a population of 380,821 in 2012.

 

Anchorage has been named an All America City four times, in 1956, 1965, 1984 85, and 2002, by the National Civic League. It has also been named by Kiplinger as the most tax friendly city in the United States The Building in downtown Anchorage is the tallest building in Alaska, and exemplifies the importance of the petroleum industry in the State economy.The resource sector, mainly petroleum, is arguably Anchorage's most visible industry, with many high rises bearing the logos of large multinationals While field operations are centered on the Alaska North Slope and south of Anchorage around Cook Inlet, the majority of offices and administration are found in Anchorage. The headquarters building of , is located in downtown Anchorage. It is also the tallest building in Alaska. Many companies who provide oilfield support services are likewise headquartered outside of Anchorage but maintain a substantial presence in the city, most notably . The Reeve Building, at the corner of West Sixth Avenue and D Street, was spared the wrecking ball when the city block it sits on was cleared to make way for the 5th Avenue Mall, and was incorporated into the mall's structure. In 2013, named Anchorage among its list of Best Places for Business and Careers.Anchorage does not levy a sales tax. It does, however, charge a 12% bed tax and an 8% tax on car rentals.

 

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Information for the state of Alaska

The 2007 gross state product was $44.9�billion, 45th in the nation. Its per capita personal income for 2007 was $40,042, ranking 15th in the nation. The oil and gas industry dominates the Alaskan economy, with more than 80% of the state's revenues derived from petroleum extraction. Alaska's main export product (excluding oil and natural gas) is seafood, primarily salmon, cod, Pollock and crab.

 

Agriculture represents only a fraction of the Alaskan economy. Agricultural production is primarily for consumption within the state and includes nursery stock, dairy products, vegetables, and livestock. Manufacturing is limited, with most foodstuffs and general goods imported from elsewhere. Employment is primarily in government and industries such as natural resource extraction, shipping, and transportation.

 

Military bases are a significant component of the economy in both Fairbanks and Anchorage. Federal subsidies are also an important part of the economy, allowing the state to keep taxes low. Its industrial outputs are crude petroleum, natural gas, coal, gold, precious metals, zinc and other mining, seafood processing, timber and wood products. There is also a growing service and tourism sector. Tourists have contributed to the economy by supporting local lodging.

 

I do not know how we could be in the position we are today without factoring.  

Companies of all different sizes, including start ups, use factoring; and today factoring has become common business practice across many industries. -Factoring Companies Ak

 

 

BECOME A WELL PAID BUSINESS OWNER  

Factoring Companies Ak Articles

The Best Kept Secret in Financial Services: Freight Bill Factoring!

 

If you’re an existing owner of a trucking business, or perhaps you’re planning on starting a trucking business, then you may be interested in Freight Bill Factoring. Freight Bill Factoring helps trucking businesses, both large and small, achieve their overall business goals; but before making any final decision you must fully understand how Factoring works.

 

Freight Bill Factoring has become very popular with trucking businesses and is often referred to as the financial backbone of the trucking business. If you’re not familiar with Freight Bill Factoring, you may not know that factoring is a financing alternative for business owners: it gives them immediate access to additional financing capital they may otherwise not have access to. The process of Freight Bill Factoring is actually quite straightforward: it involves a factoring company purchasing bill of ladings at a discounted rate. This process is a win-win situation for both the trucking company who receives immediate funds and for the broker who pays for the invoices.

 

Freight Bill Factoring Is Not New!

 

Freight bill factoring is not a new idea; in fact, it has a long, rich tradition. Most civilizations that have engaged in commerce have also engaged in factoring in one form or another. For example, business relationships during the colonial period in North America were required to make cash payments in advance against Accounts Receivable in order for the business to continue with its commercial operations, prior to their users being paid for their goods. So, they were engaged in factoring!

 

Factoring Specialists Have Many Services to Offer

 

Of course, factoring has become a lot more sophisticated over the years, and today it’s focused on financial management, credit worthiness, and on collections. However, the basic concept of purchasing Accounts Receivable has stayed the same. In addition, the modern factoring company of today can do a lot more than just funding: a factoring specialist can assist clients by evaluating and setting credit limits, verifying customer’s credit worthiness, and professionally managing Accounts Receivable collections. Right across North America we see factoring companies existing in all forms and serving business sectors and industries of all types; and today, many large financial institutions even have their own factoring divisions. Generally, though, factoring companies are smaller, independently owned enterprises.

 

Banks Step Out as Factoring Steps In

 

Factoring has become very popular with trucking businesses because, as most business owners can verify, commercial lenders have become increasingly inflexible, with stricter regulations and ever-changing lending criteria. This inflexibility has forced both small and medium sized businesses to search for alternative financing sources, and this is where factoring has stepped in. Factoring is a simple, workable, solution-based process, providing an alternative for trucking businesses when traditional means of financing are not available. Factoring is proving to be a great financial remedy, particularly as banks and other lenders are becoming less friendly to small business owners.

 

Factoring Companies Operate Worldwide

 

The volume of factoring around the world has today exceeded the trillion-dollar mark! Factoring companies operate on every continent and, in the last four years, worldwide factoring transactions have increased by 60%. And that’s why we say that Freight Bill Factoring is the best kept secret in financial services!

 

 

I do not know how we could be in the position we are today without factoring.

 

 

Factoring Companies Ak Articles

The Basics of Invoice Factoring: Choosing a Factoring Company

 

Probably the biggest frustration for business to business (B2B) companies is waiting to get paid.Anyone involved in a seasonal business, long payment cycle, or lumpy cash flow will be able to relate to this statement. Some customers are very slow payers (of course corporate clients and governments come to mind!) and other customers demand generous terms.

 

Explaining Invoice Factoring

 

Basically, with invoice factoring your current but unpaid invoices are turned into cash – it’s a financing solution for businesses. Other terms used for factoring are ‘Accounts Receivable Financing’, ‘Invoice Financing ‘and ‘Receivables Financing’. Because many clients demand generous terms, it means that invoices can remain unpaid for anywhere between 30 and 90 days; while in the meantime you’re left without cash and falling behind on important expenses, such as payroll, and missing opportunities to grow your business. And this is where factoring comes in: factoring reduces, and sometimes eliminates the frustration of unpaid accounts.

 

A receivable financing transaction usually involves three parties, and these are the company that initially issues the invoice, the customer who is required to pay the invoice (otherwise known as the account debtor), and the ‘factor’, which is the financing company prepared to supply the cash.

 

Explaining Invoice Financing

 

An invoice is issued to a customer after a company has delivered a service or product. This invoice will now be sold to the factor and, in return, the company will receive a cash advance: this will usually be between 70% and 90% of the invoice’s value. With this cash the company finds it easier to pay employees; plus, it can now purchase supplies, materials, and inventory, and it can take on more work. Once the debtor pays their invoice the business will receive a rebate for the rest of the funds, less a fee which will be based on the value of the invoice and the term. This type of financial agreement benefits all three parties: the customer receives cash almost immediately, the debtor gets favorable payment terms, and the factoring company collects a fee.

 

Explaining the Difference between Traditional Bank Financing and Invoice Financing

 

There are, of course, both drawbacks and benefits to this type of financing for businesses. The obvious benefits of factoring are a simpler application process, quicker funding, and higher approval rates when compared to bank lending. Having access to cash allows a business to grow, to meet payroll, achieve supplier discounts for bulk purchases or early payment, and to purchase equipment in order to improve productivity.

 

Factoring has a very simple application process which eliminates some of the main hurdles placed on small businesses by banks. The speed of funding with factoring offers businesses the opportunity to take advantage of opportunities as they arise. In addition, the high approval rates with factoring means that many more businesses qualify, even though they may have previously been declined by a bank. Another bonus is that funds received from factoring invoices can be used to supplement bank credit, if necessary.

 

On the other hand, when it comes to cost, a line of credit at a bank is less expensive than factoring; this is assuming that the business will be successful in their application to the bank and that they’ll have access to the finance within a reasonable timeframe. Unfortunately, these applications are not always successful (four out of five companies are refused bank loans), while others find the whole process too discouraging.

 

Another possible issue with working with traditional factoring companies is that some of these companies will advise your customers that their invoices have been financed: this information can cause issues for some small businesses because they prefer to maintain control over all correspondence with their clients. Other factoring companies actually take control of your account receivables. Our advice is that you look for a factoring company that’s prepared to work on a non notification basis.

 

Receivables Financing Has Become Good Business Sense

 

Today we see factoring becoming quite commonplace in many industries, such as IT companies, professional services, wholesale trade, marketing, manufacturing companies and so on. Many, many industries are discovering the benefits of receivables financing.

 

Invoice factoring is an ideal solution for business to business companies who issue invoices payable within 15 to 90 days. Any B2B company who’s experiencing rapid growth, long payment cycles, or lumpy cash flow, will benefit the most from accounts receivable factoring. On the other hand, businesses and business to consumer (B2C) companies that are paid on delivery and don’t issue invoices would have no need of factoring services.

 

If you’re interested in invoice financing and believe it may be an option for your business, see below for our tips on how to approach working with a factoring company.

 

How to Work with an Invoice Factoring Company

 

There are many advantages to invoice financing, but it can be tricky working with some traditional factoring companies. Some factoring companies don’t have excellent customer service, and between confusing terms, long term contracts, monthly minimums, and hidden penalties, the experience can be quite daunting. Our aim is to ensure that you get a fair deal when working with a factoring company, and please remember that, as always, if a deal sounds too good to be true, then it probably is!

 

You’re Looking for Transparent Factoring Fees and Rates

 

Companies that make it difficult to work out their all inclusive fees are companies who are working for their own advantage, so when determining pricing, transparency is key. If you’re getting frustrated and not receiving direct answers, we suggest you move on to another factoring company that will be respectful of your time.

 

Another Word of Caution: Beware of receivables factoring companies who advertise low rates, which then increase when all their hidden fees come to light. We’ve heard of factoring companies who charge low monthly factoring rates, but you’ll be charged for two months’ even if the invoice was paid in one month and one day. We also know that some factors require monthly minimums, which means that you pay for financing even if it’s not required. We strongly suggest that you read our article on factoring rates and tricks so that you approach factoring with knowledge and awareness.

 

Understanding Penalties, and How to Avoid Them

 

Be aware that some invoice factoring companies out there have hidden penalties. In order to avoid these penalties, you need to know why they occur. If you believe these penalties are out of proportion or unfair, then move on to another factor. It won’t be long before you’ll understand what fair and reasonable terms look like.

 

Read the Fine Print in Your Contract

 

In order to guarantee their profits, most factoring companies will try to lock you into a long term contract. Obviously this is good business for the factoring company, but it may not be so good for your business. You need to know what you’re signing up for, so be aware of long term contracts where you’ll be charged exorbitant cancellation fees if you should decide to leave.

 

Also, be aware that some long term contracts include minimums, so consider this carefully: you may find yourself paying for something you’re not using when you only needed the factoring company to meet occasional cash flow needs. You shouldn’t be forced to remain with a service that’s not meeting your needs, so it’s vitally important that you carefully read the fine print.

 

Customer Confidentiality

 

Once you start your research on factoring you’ll discover that most factoring companies operate on a notification basis, which means that when you sell your invoices to the factor, they notify your customers. They’ll also ask that the funds be routed directly to the factoring company’s bank account, instead of your account. This can be an issue for business owners who prefer to have control of all communications with their customers. If discretion is important to you and your business,

 

we strongly suggest that your accounts receivable financing company provides non notification factoring, meaning that you retain control over customer communications. If this is not an option for your factoring company, then you need to move to a companythat will provide non notification factoring.

 

How Much Cash Will You Receive Upfront?

 

You’ll receive an advance upfront, which is a percentage of the face value of the invoice. This advance will probably be somewhere between 70% and 90% of the invoice’s face value. For example, let’s say your customer owes you $1000: your advance payment should be somewhere between $700 and $900.

 

Factoring Minimums Compared with Single Invoice Discounting

 

You’ll also notice in your research that many factors require small businesses to submit all invoices from certain customers. On the other hand, ‘single invoice discounting’, also known as ‘spot factoring’, means that the business concerned determines which invoices will be sent to the factoring company for advance payment. Make sure you understand your factoring company’s terms before you sign anything. Single invoice discounting or spot factoring is generally the preferred method for small businesses because it enables you to retain control over your financing by determining which invoices will be sent for factoring.

 

Choosing Your Factoring Company

 

Think about all the above criteria, and look for a business partner who will provide your business with the best combination of flexibility, features, and terms that you require. By doing a little research you’ll soon find a partner and an agreement that offers you the flexibility, funds, terms, and transparency that work best for you. Your aim is to find a partner that you’ll be happy to work with long term, so don’t settle for anything less.

 

 

 

 

Factoring Companies Ak Articles

Explaining ‘Factoring’

 

A ‘Factor’ is a third party commercial financial company who purchases the Accounts Receivable from businesses: this transaction is known as ‘Factoring’. Factoring exists so that businesses can receive a quick injection of cash, as opposed to waiting the 60 or 90 days for customers to pay their invoices. Factoring is also known as Accounts Receivable Financing, and Invoice Factoring.

 

The majority of factoring companies purchase invoices and advance money to the business within 24 hours; however, the nature and terms of factoring can (and do) differ among financial service providers and industries. Depending on your customers’ credit histories, your industry, and other specific criteria, the advance rate on your invoices can range from 80% to as high as 95%. The factoring company not only collects on your invoices; it also offers back office support to your business.Once the factoring company has collected on your customer’s invoice,you’ll be paid the balance of the invoice – less the factor’s fee for assuming the risk. The primary benefit of factoring is that businesses no longer need to wait anywhere between one and three months for a customer to pay their accounts: they now have access to cash in hand so they can operate and grow their business.The Advantages of Factoring

 

There are a few reasons why factoring has become an invaluable financial tool for many businesses, including start ups. As mentioned above, the main benefit is that businesses can now receive a quick boost to their cash flow because factoring companies, in general, will provide cash on accounts receivable within 24 hours. This resolves the problems businesses experience with short term cash flow, and in many ways this injection of cash can help to grow a business. Besides handling your customer collections, factoring companies can also evaluate your customers’ payment and credit histories.Other benefits of factoring include:

 

• It can be customized to a business’s needs and managed to ensure that capital is available when it’s needed;
• It’s not based on your own business or credit history: it’s based on the quality of your customers’ credit;
• It’s not based on your company’s net worth: it provides a line of credit based on sales;
• There’s no limit to the amount of financing, unlike conventional bank loans;
• This financing will not show up as a debt on your balance sheet, because it’s not a loan.
Who Uses Factoring?

 

Companies of all different sizes, including start ups, use factoring; and today factoring has become common business practice across many industries. Factoring is now widely used in the transportation industry, including manufacturing, textiles, trucking, oilfield services, wholesale and distribution, and staffing agencies. Interestingly, factoring receivables is practiced in many countries around the world and has a long history of success.

 

Can I Factor? My Company’s New, with No Financial History

 

Yes, you can! In fact, factoring has become an excellent tool for start up companies because no company credit history or balance sheet is required. It’s not really your company’s finances that the factoring company is concerned with; they’ll base their financing on your customers’ payment histories and credit scores.

 

What Percentage of My Invoices Should I Factor?

 

The answer to this question really depends on the unique needs of your business. Some companies only factor invoices for customers who typically take a long time to pay, while others factor all their invoices. The receivables that a company can factor range anywhere from a few thousand dollars to millions of dollars each and every month.

 

What’s the Difference between Factoring and a Bank Loan?

 

• The difference between factoring and a bank loan is that you’re not assuming any debt with factoring because it’s not a loan;
• With factoring, there’s no emphasis on your balance sheet – it’s all on your customer’s invoices;
• In addition, a bank loan is typically one lump sum, whereas factoring provides a steady flow of funds;
• Factoring companies can also help improve your company’s balance sheet by assisting with your credit and collection functions;
• A bank loan adds to your debt, whereas factoring converts receivables (an asset) into cash (another asset);
• And of course, bank loans can be very difficult to get because they’re limited by your balance sheet.
How Do You Start the Factoring Process?

 

The factoring process can be very simple to set up. The customer will be asked to complete a short application form, and may be required to follow up with other reports and documents.

 

Recourse and Non Recourse Factoring: What’s the Difference?

 

• With Recourse factoring the client is ultimately responsibility for the payment of the invoice; whereas
• With Non Recourse factoring, the factoring company accepts responsibility for the risk of collecting the invoice.It’s important to note that some factoring companies over offer both types of factoring – recourse and non recourse.

 

What Are the Contract Terms and Fees Applicable with Factoring?

 

There are different fee structures with different factoring companies: some factors charge an overall factoring fee which is determined by the creditworthiness of your customers and the monthly volume of invoices; while others charge additional fees to cover shipping, money transfers, and other costs associated with doing business. Before signing with any factoring company make sure you understand the fees and terms applicable to your contract. Also note that most factoring contacts are renewed annually.

 

Do I Need Credit Insurance on Debtors?

 

Insurance is not typically required, but in specific circumstances it may be.

 

 

 

You Can Find More Information at  http://roomsretouched.com/
and at Factoring Companies-accountingreceivable.com

Call Us Today at: 1-866-593-2195

 

Watch our Factoring Company Video below to see how we work for you.

 

 


 

Get MONEY NOW for your outstanding receivables.

 

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